Fenland Ju-Jitsu Academy

Site Owned and operated by Aloda Ltd Registered Office : , Low Cottage, 10 Low Cross, Whittlesey, Peterborough, PE7 1HW.


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Origins of Ju-Jitsu

The Origin of Ju-Jitsu

The origin of Ju-Jitsu is not clear, however the first publicly recognized Ju-Jitsu Ryu was formed by Takenouchi Hisamori in 1532 and consisted of techniques using a sword, jo-stick and dagger as well as unarmed techniques. The Takenouchi-Ryu may be regarded as the primal branch for the teaching of arts similar to that of Ju-Jitsu.

Several hundred years later there was a general shift from the weapon forms of fighting to weaponless styles. These weaponless styles were developed from the grappling techniques of the weapon styles and were collectively known as Ju-Jitsu.

Fukuno Schichiroemon of Temba started the Kito-Ryu in the middle of the 17th century. The Kito-Ryu gained great prestige and popularity with its “Art of Throwing” and “Form Practice.” In close connection with this branch was the Jikishin-Ryu, whose founder was Terada Kanemon, a contemporary of Fukono. They established two separate systems of Ju-Jitsu. These two systems appear to be the oldest of all the varied systems of Ju-Jitsu.

It has been estimated that over 750 systems of Ju-Jitsu were in existence in Japan from 1603-1868. The branches of Ju-Jitsu grew during the feudal period. The art continued in various provinces in Japan until the later part of the 18th century, when it began to decline with the impending fall of feudalism.

Kano Jigoro opened his first Kodokan dojo in the early 1880’s in Tokyo. Kano used his knowledge and experience of Ju-Jitsu to create Judo. During the Kodokan’s years, Judo almost completely smothered the prevailing Ju-Jitsu traditions of the area, perhaps due to Judo’s success in direct competitions with various Ju-Jitsu forms.

The British Ju Jitsu Association was founded in 1968 and reconstituted in 1993 and is the National Governing Body for Ju Jitsu in the UK.